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Starting Export Introduction.




Introduction


How to Start Export is a fair question that every first time exporter wants to ask. Export in itself is a very wide concept and lot of preparations is required by an exporter before starting an export business.

A key success factor in starting any export company is clear understanding and detail knowledge of products to be exported. In order to be a successful in exporting one must fully research its foreign market rather than try to tackle every market at once. The exporter should approach a market on a priority basis. Overseas design and product must be studies properly and considered carefully. Because there are specific laws dealing with International trade and foreign business, it is imperative that you familiarize yourself with state, federal, and international laws before starting your export business.

Price is also an important factor. So, before starting an export business an exporter must considered the price offered to the buyers. As the selling price depends on sourcing price, try to avoid unnecessary middlemen who only add cost but no value. It helps a lot on cutting the transaction cost and improving the quality of the final products.

However, before we go deep into "How to export ?” let us discuss what an export is and how the Government of Indian has defined it.

In very simple terms, export may be defined as the selling of goods to a foreign country. However, As per Section 2 (e) of the India Foreign Trade Act (1992), the term export may be defined as 'an act of taking out of India any goods by land, sea or air and with proper transaction of money”.

Exporting a product is a profitable method that helps to expand the business and reduces the dependence in the local market. It also provides new ideas, management practices, marketing techniques, and ways of competing, which is not possible in the domestic market. Even as an owner of a domestic market, an individual businessman should think about exporting. Research shows that, on average, exporting companies are more profitable than their non-exporting counterparts.


Why Need to Export


There are many good reasons for exporting:

The first and the primary reason for export is to earn foreign exchange. The foreign exchange not only brings profit for the exporter but also improves the economic condition of the country.

Secondly, companies that export their goods are believed to be more reliable than their counterpart domestic companies assuming that exporting company has survive the test in meeting international standards.

Thirdly, free exchange of ideas and cultural knowledge opens up immense business and trade opportunities for a company.

Fourthly, as one starts visiting customers to sell one’s goods, he has an opportunity to start exploring for newer customers, state-of-the-art machines and vendors in foreign lands.

Fifthly, by exporting goods, an exporter also becomes safe from offset lack of demand for seasonal products.

Lastly, international trade keeps an exporter more competitive and less vulnerable to the market as the exporter may have a business boom in one sector while simultaneously witnessing a bust in a different sector.

No doubt that in the age of globalization and liberalizations, Export has became of the most lucrative business in India. Government of India is also supporting exporters through various incentives and schemes to promote Indian export for meeting the much needed requirements for importing modern technology and adopting new technology from MNCs through Joint ventures and collaboration.

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What is New?

Date: 21-04-2017
Customs Notification No. 17/2017
Seeks to exempt goods, falling under the First Schedule to the Customs Tariff Act, 1975, when imported into India by or along with a unit of the Army, the Navy, the Air Force or the Central Paramilitary Forces on the occasion of its return to India after a tour of service abroad, from basic customs duty (BCD), CVD and SAD subject to the specified conditions.

Date: 21-04-2017
Trade Notice No. 04/2018
Consideration of applications for grant of Licences/ Authorisations for import of “Gold Dore”

Date: 20-04-2017
Notification No.40/2017 - Customs (N.T.)
Rate of exchange of conversion of the foreign currency with effect from 21st April, 2017

Date: 20-04-2017
Customs Notification No. 16/2017
Seeks to exempt goods falling under chapter 30 of first schedule of Customs tariff Act 1975, for supply under Patient Assistance Programme run by specified pharmaceutical companies

Date: 19-04-2017
Customs Instruction No. 05/2017
Meeting with representatives of Foreign Missions -reg.

Date: 19-04-2017
DGFT Notification No. 03/2015-2020
Exemption from the application of quantitative ceiling and export bans on export of organic agricultural products (wheat, non-Basmati rice) and organic processed products (edibleoils and sugar) and enhancement of quantitative ceiling on export of pulses & lentils

Date: 19-04-2017
Customs Circular No. 15/2017
DRescinding Board Circular F. No. 528/213/87 - Customs (TU)

Date: 19-04-2017
DGFT Public Notice No. 02/2015-2020
Amendment in Standard Input Output Norms A-39 under Chemical & Allied Product Group –reg

Date: 18-04-2017
Customs Notification No. 14/2017
Amendment to Notification No.41/1999-Cus to align the said notification with para 4.36 of FTP 2015-20 by omitting the word 'for export' in the proviso to the notification

Date: 13-04-2017
DGFT Notification No. 02/2015-2020
TRQ for Raw Sugar: Amendment in import policy of raw sugar classified under Exim Code 170114 of Chapter 17 of ITC (HS), 2017–Schedule–1 (Import Policy